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I first met Billy soon after he'd accepted Wolves' invitation to join the Board of Directors at Molineux. I was Sports Editor at BBC Radio WM... he was a legend.... and the club was at rock bottom. But Billy's beloved Wolves were on the way back. Under the astute management of Graham Turner, the renaissance had begun... and no-one was more delighted than Billy. That's when I asked him to do a very special job.

I was on the look-out for an expert summariser to join our commentary team at Wembley for the Sherpa Van Trophy final. Who better than Billy ? Back home in the Black Country, thousands of Wolves fans who couldn't get to the game hung on his every word.

The result – beating Burnley – was perfect. So too was Billy's contribution to a fantastic day. I'll never forget the joy on his face. the tear in his eye, or the incredible reception he received from countless football fans as they caught sight of the great man en route to the Wembley commentary box. Every request for an autograph or photograph was greeted with a smile and a joke. It's a pretty safe bet that most, like me, will never forget meeting with Billy Wright that day... long after memories of Robbie Dennison's superb free-kick have faded !!

IAN WINTER Sports Presenter/Reporter, BBC Look East, Norwich


My Dad was a Wolves supporter before WWII in Stan Cullis' playing days. In 1949 I was a nine-year-old boy living in rural South Shropshire on a farm. Wolves won the FA Cup beating Leicester City 3-1 and I did not want the year to end! All summer I practised heading a ball against one of our farm buildings, dreaming that I was like my boyhood hero, Billy Wright, playing for Wolves and England. To this day there has been no one like him.

In the mid Fifties when Wolves played some of the European teams my father, brother and I would walk a couple of miles to the nearest farm of one of our friends who had a generator to make electricity and a television set to go with it. These are magic memories.

During my first year at Bishops Castle County High School I also had the honour of playing against Billy's brother Laurence when he played for the Shrewsbury Technical College side. Just to play on the same pitch as the brother of my England idol was a cherished experience and memory.

Sadly both the Wright boys from Ironbridge are now deceased but my memories as a proud Shropshire lad live on.

DAVID BOWEN Exeter, Devon


This is not so much a Billy Wright story as an observation

Once, when about 12-years-old, I attended a presentation/talk at Ekco Plastics factory, Southend on Sea, Essex , where Billy Wright was the guest speaker. It must have been just after he won his 100th international cap. I still remember his blond hair, Black country nasal voice and what I now appreciate as a presence about him. You just knew he was a nice person. Nothing wrong in being 'Nice.' I am 55 years old now but I still remember that evening – and Billy Wright.

RUSS LEAVER Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire


I can recall instances from the early 60's when Billy Wright was one of my sporting heroes and how approachable both he and his wife Joy were. He used to appear on the childrens programme Magpie encouraging young boys to always clean their football boots. I took notice!

When he was a manager at Arsenal, I sent him a birthday card for February 6th. He sent a reply on Arsenal headed note paper with his signature thanking me. Once on a trip to Llandudno with my parents, I saw the Beverley Sisters in a shop. Joy signed a postcard of Conway Castle for me from Joy and Billy Wright. I still have the postcard and letter. These kind gestures even at an early age were never forgotten.

IAN BAILLIE

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